mark barton Photography

About back

My name is Mark Barton. I'm a British nature photographer based in Bristol, specialising in macro (close-up) photography.
I'm fascinated by the little things around us; the closer I look, the more I seem to find. I have yet to meet a photographer quite as enthralled by mosses as I was during spring 2012. Macro photography gives me a great sense of exploration and I try to convey that in my images, revealing a world often overlooked or pigeon-holed. I gained a first class  degree in Wildlife and Environmental Photography at Blackpool and The Fylde College - it is on this course that my interest really flourished and branched out. Surrounded by like-minded people who always pushed me to try to come up with fresh visual ideas and points of view, I developed my own style and niche in the market.
Wildlife and nature photography are difficult and time consuming, but very rewarding. Entering a natural environment with the express intent of translating your experiences visually for others really makes you appreciate what is around us. I am continuing to develop my technique and style: I feel it is important to stand out stylistically as a photographer, especially nowadays when the competition seems to grow exponentially each year.

In addition to this website, I also run a hardware review site at pixeldensity.net
and a small photography tuition business at bristolphotographytuition.co.uk

To keep updated with blog articles and news follow me on facebook!

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Location

I am based in Bristol, UK. I have easy access to and often travel around the Southwest and South Wales. (above map is not representative of exact location)

Bristol UK

07881785483

mail@markbarton.co.uk

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Autumn Photography

After much perseverance I have had some success in competitions this year. In the BWPA I was awarded a "Highly Commended" for my pinhead slime mould image (top image on the right). Another of my images; a feather-moss, though not awarded, will appear in the competition book published each year alongside the winning images. The winning images will be touring the UK in an exhibition later this year......

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2013

After much perseverance I have had some success in competitions this year. In the BWPA I was awarded a "Highly Commended" for my pinhead slime mould image (top image on the right). Another of my images; a feather-moss, though not awarded, will appear in the competition book published each year alongside the winning images. The winning images will be touring the UK in an exhibition later this year......

Brecon Beacons - 22nd April 2013

I recently went for a night walk in the Brecons. starting at 11PM I hoped to capture images of the Lyrid meteor shower. Unfortunately conditions weren't great for night shooting, thick fog not only killed visibility but also condensed on my filters and forced me to spend a lot of time cleaning them and avoiding doing long exposures. The first image is me atop Pen Y Fan, this highest point in the UK south of Snowdon......

Second Severn Crossing - 1st April 2013

On this night I was hoping to capture star trails over this giant bridge spanning the Severn Estuary. It turns out I had seriously underestimated the levels of light pollution. Looking across from the English side I found myself pointing directly towards Cardiff and a very strong yellow glow. This effect is much more pronounced during long exposures at night. The star trail shots I did get were barely visible......

Cairngorms National Park - January 2013

Firstly, apologies for the lack of updates over the recent months. Unfortunately I've been having to concentrate on other things. This month however, I had planned a week's trip to the Cairngorms National Park in the middle of winter, which gave me time to indulge my photographer's itch. This first image is a view from a ridge on the north side of Loch Avon, one of the least accessible Lochs on the mainland......

Brecon Beacons & Bristol - 6th November 2012

This has been my first attempt at star trail photography, and also my first proper try at night photography. My plan was to get star trail shots in the Brecons, so I waited for a very clear night and headed up there for 3AM. The first image here is a 24 minute exposure. The fourth shot is a bit of a fluke actually. I did an hour long exposure aiming directly into the sky with my super-wide angle lens in order to capture......

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Autumn Photography

Autumn is the time of year which best lends itself to my kind of photography. Over the last couple of weeks I've had the best possible conditions for shooting slime moulds (my current project) - early autumn, little rain, overcast but not dark. All of these images were shot in Leigh Woods, Bristol "in the field" in natural light. All are long exposures as you'll be used to from me by now. And all were shot with Canon's magic MP-E 65 lens + super-beefy tripod combination. I have recently come to realise the immensity of the task of identifying these things! Species are often propagated worldwide, and appear different dependent on age.... and there are 100s of species. Still, I will give it a go.

I won't be able to do any shooting over the next two weeks (macro wise), so I hope that there will be some more favourable conditions come mid-October or else this could mark the end of the project for this year (almost all of my slime mould shots last year were taken before the end of September). Fingers crossed.

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British Wildlife Photography Awards 2013

After much perseverance I have had some success in competitions this year. In the BWPA I was awarded a "Highly Commended" for my pinhead slime mould image (top image on the right). Another of my images; a feather-moss, though not awarded, will appear in the competition book published each year alongside the winning images as one of the "Top 170".
The winning images will be touring the UK in an exhibition later this year, you can find the dates and locations on the BWPA website here.

In other news, I am going to be part of the volunteer team at Wildphotos this October, very excited to be involved in this fantastic event. I have been there twice and each time have come away from it brimming with inspiration.

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Brecon Beacons - 22nd April 2013

I recently went for a night walk in the Brecons. starting at 11PM I hoped to capture images of the Lyrid meteor shower. Unfortunately conditions weren't great for night shooting, thick fog not only killed visibility but also condensed on my filters and forced me to spend a lot of time cleaning them and avoiding doing long exposures. The first image is me atop Pen Y Fan, this highest point in the UK south of Snowdon, taken at around half-past midnight. After Pen Y Fan I went on to climb Corn Du (very close by), and then Cribyn (a bit further). On the way back from Cribyn the fog got so thick that my headtorch served no purpose save to blind me. I should point out that I wouldn't have attempted this if I didn't have a good knowledge of the area, a compass and good mobile reception. A stunning sunrise made up for the lackluster night shooting conditions, though it caught me completely off guard! If I thought it was going to look like this I would have positioned myself better! In any case I am quite happy with some of the sunrise shots I got.

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Second Severn Crossing - 1st April 2013

On this night I was hoping to capture star trails over this giant bridge spanning the Severn Estuary. It turns out I had seriously underestimated the levels of light pollution. Looking across from the English side I found myself pointing directly towards Cardiff and a very strong yellow glow. This effect is much more pronounced during long exposures at night. The star trail shots I did get were barely visible and so I decided to simply photograph the architecture. I had plenty of opportunity to use my new tilt-shift lens. I experimented using it to correct and also to intentionally distort part of the scene, and to create an unnatural depth of field.

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Cairngorms National Park - January 2013

Firstly, apologies for the lack of updates over the recent months. Unfortunately I've been having to concentrate on other things. This month however, I had planned a week's trip to the Cairngorms National Park in the middle of winter, which gave me time to indulge my photographer's itch. This first image is a view from a ridge on the north side of Loch Avon, one of the least accessible Lochs on the mainland. Standing here gave a fantastic feeling of wilderness, with no other people in sight for miles. Somewhere in the fog towards the right is Ben Macdui, the second highest peak in the UK.
I got precious few wildlife shots this trip - everything seemed to be hunkered down in the harsh conditions, but I did get this one of a Ptarmigan in winter plumage. They were very difficult to spot and I wouldn't have even seen it if it hadn't been for another member of the group. The third image required us to begin climbing before sunrise, with the aim to get as high as possible before the sun was fully up. It is a view looking towards the top of Cairn Gorm, the 6th highest peak in the UK.
It wasn't all mountain climbing though, we visited some very picturesque lochs at lower altitudes. The second and seventh images are from Loch An Eileen, with the mountain range making a perfect backdrop. On this day the wind was very calm and the reflections were almost perfect.
One group of animals we had no problem finding were woodland birds. As soon as we arrived in Loch Garten we were mobbed by dozens of Coal Tits (this was before we got the seed out), with other species getting in on the action too. They were so habituated that they would land on your head if they thought there was a sunflower seed in it for them. The fifth image was taken on the last day, and is the closest I got to taking the "dreamy snow shot" that I wanted, the blurred background is the Abernethy forest with sheep grazing along its edge.

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Brecon Beacons Star Trails
& Bristol Sunrise - 6th November 2012

This has been my first attempt at star trail photography, and also my first proper try at night photography. My plan was to get star trail shots in the Brecons, so I waited for a very clear night and headed up there for 3AM. The first image here is a 24 minute exposure. The fourth shot is a bit of a fluke actually. I did an hour long exposure aiming directly into the sky with my super-wide angle lens in order to capture the star trails. What I didn't count on however, was that left out in sub-zero temperatures for so long, the lens would freeze over. After returning an hour later I was dismayed to see a crust of ice over the whole front element, but then looking at the image, realised that this effect had "feathered" the trails and given the stars a definite clockwise direction. They all look like little comets! I was pretty happy with that and kept the image! The light coloured vertical stripe, about 2/3 of the way along the frame is the Milky Way.
On returning to Bristol along the Portway around 7AM I ran into incredibly thick fog and proceeded to race up to the suspension bridge to catch some images of it. The fog was so thick it gave the impression of a liquid flowing down the gorge. Spectacular!

Purchase back

If you would like to license my work for commercial purposes, I am represented by SuperStock.co.uk (click to be taken to my collection). If the image you are looking for is not available there, I can license it directly, please contact me for pricing.

If you would like to buy a limited edition print, please e-mail me at mail@markbarton.co.uk, my prices are
detailed below:

75cm x 50 cm - £60 + p&p

60cm x 40cm - £50 + p&p

45cm x 30cm - £40 + p&p

30cm x 20cm - £30 + p&p

Prints are delivered unframed in a reinforced postage tube.
Postage within the UK is £5.
Outside the UK vary, please ask for a quote.
Payment can be made by PayPal.